A Federal case for cloud

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Here’s a case where the Federal government is taking the lead on innovation that makes sense for just about any company out there.

A report from InformationWeek magazine reports a significant increase in the number of Federal agencies using cloud-based services.  Of the people who responded to a survey, the report finds almost three times as many are using cloud at their workplace as used it a year ago.  It also finds another 29 percent will implement cloud services within the next year.  Which means, the magazine says, that more than half of Federal government agencies will be using cloud solutions, in one form or another, over the next year.

It makes perfect sense, when you think about it.  Like companies everywhere, the government is trying to lower its costs wherever possible.  Unlike many companies, the scope of Washington’s efforts is gargantuan:  the government, according to InformationWeek, wants to close 800 data centers.  So, it comes as no surprise to find that lowering IT costs was the first priority of the survey respondents; 62 percent said it was their most important consideration.

It’s also not surprising that security was the respondents’ greatest concern:  more than three-quarters (77%) said it’s an issue moving forward.   Almost half (46%) said they’d prefer to keep their data in a private cloud.

In short, IT administrators in the Federal government are very much our customers at Windstream.  They appreciate the flexibility cloud solutions give them, and like how it can help them cut the needed amount of resources, and thus the cost.  But they’re worried about the security of the data stored in the cloud.  And Here’s a case where the Federal government is taking the lead on innovation that makes sense for just about any company out there.

A report from InformationWeek magazine reports a significant increase in the number of Federal agencies using cloud-based services.  Of the people who responded to a survey, the report finds almost three times as many are using cloud at their workplace as used it a year ago.  It also finds another 29 percent will implement cloud services within the next year.  Which means, the magazine says, that more than half of Federal government agencies will be using cloud solutions, in one form or another, over the next year.

It makes perfect sense, when you think about it.  Like companies everywhere, the government is trying to lower its costs wherever possible.  Unlike many companies, the scope of Washington’s efforts is gargantuan:  the government, according to InformationWeek, wants to close 800 data centers.  So, it comes as no surprise to find that lowering IT costs was the first priority of the survey respondents; 62 percent said it was their most important consideration.

It’s also not surprising that security was the respondents’ greatest concern:  more than three-quarters (77%) said it’s an issue moving forward.   Almost half (46%) said they’d prefer to keep their data in a private cloud.

In short, IT administrators in the Federal government are very much our customers at Windstream.  They appreciate the flexibility cloud solutions give them, and like how it can help them cut the needed amount of resources, and thus the cost.  But they’re worried about the security of the data stored in the cloud.  And while your data may not be critical to our national security, it is clearly important to the future of your business.

At Windstream, we focus on providing a full range of cloud solutions that help you meet your challenges.  Whether it’s public, private or hybrid cloud, we’ve helped pioneer many of the strategies that companies take for granted these days.  And we run the gamut of options, from simple cloud storage to Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) implementations, which enable companies to pay greater attention to their core competencies and less to the technologies behind it.

InformationWeek surveyed 137 Federal employees to get their take on cloud computing.  We work with hundreds of thousands of companies every day, so we’d like to think we have a pretty good handle on what they’re thinking.  And on this one, Capitol Hill and Main Street appear to be pretty much in sync.